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Neiman Marcus Debt Rallies as Financial Results Top Expectations

Debt backing Neiman Marcus Group shot up today after the company posted financial results that bested analyst expectations due to better sales at its stores that it partly attributed to increased tourism and the oil patch recovery.

The issuer’s term loan due October 2020 (L+325, 1% LIBOR floor) was bracketing 90 this morning, up roughly two-to-three points since yesterday, sources said.

With the company remaining vague on its intentions to pay its interest in kind past the April 15 coupon date, the Neiman Marcus $628 million issue of 8.75%/9.50% senior PIK toggle notes due 2021 rallied more than eight points to a 14-month high of 68.75.

In an effort to preserve liquidity, the company previously elected to pay interest for the period to Oct. 14 in the form of more debt.

The company’s $960 million issue of 8% cash-pay notes due 2021 gained as much as 5 points, to 69.

The retailer today reported $1.48 billion in sales for its fiscal second quarter ended Jan. 27. The performance was up 6.2% from the year-ago equivalent period and above the $1.47 billion estimate cited in a note from Citi analyst Jenna Giannelli. Adjusted EBITDA for the quarter came in at $155 million, ahead of Citi’s $144 million projection and up roughly 22% from the same period last year.

Company executives in a conference call this morning cited improvements in the oil patch, which contributed to better operating results at its Texas stores, and increased tourism to its locations during the holiday season as some of the reasons behind the solid numbers.

On the call today, CEO Geoffroy van Raemdonck said the company has now recorded two straight quarters of sales increases for the first time since fiscal 2015, and that its online business now accounts for more than 34% of total revenue.

Also on the call, Chief Accounting Officer T. Dale Stapleton addressed the company’s liquidity position.

“I think we’re extremely comfortable with our liquidity providing us with sufficient funds to fund our operations as well [as] strategic initiatives,” Stapleton said, according to a transcript from S&P Global Market Intelligence. “So I think that’s one critical point. I think the second critical point is that with the maturity ladder of our debt, we don’t see the first maturities until October of 2020. And so given where we sit today, we believe that we have sufficient kind of runway to kind of think about our debt, our capital structure in a very thoughtful, deliberative and prudent way. Throughout kind of the downturn, I think we have been very active in managing our liquidity, and we will be active and proactive in managing through kind of our capital structure.”

Current CEO van Raemdonck joined the company earlier this year after Karen Katz stepped down from her post.

Corporate ratings are CCC/Caa2. — Kelsey Butler/Rachelle Kakouris

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