Southcross Holdings emerges from Chapter 11

Southcross Holdings, the parent company of Southcross Energy Partners, has emerged from Chapter 11, the company announced yesterday.

As reported, the bankruptcy court overseeing the company’s Chapter 11 on April 11 confirmed the company’s reorganization plan and approved the adequacy of its disclosure statement following a combined hearing.

As also reported, the company filed a prepackaged Chapter 11 on March 28 in Corpus Christi, Texas (see “Southcross Holdings files prepack Ch. 11 with new $170M investment,” LCD News, March 28, 2016). The reorganization plan will result in the elimination of almost $700 million of funded debt and preferred equity obligations, along with a new $170 million equity investment from the company’s existing equity holders, EIG Global Energy Partners and Tailwater Capital.

Among other things, under the company’s contemplated reorganization plan, an $85 million DIP from existing equity holders is to be converted into one-third of the equity of the reorganized company. DIP lenders are also to provide an additional exit investment of $85 million for an additional one-third of the reorganized equity. The company’s term lenders are slated to receive, among other things, the remaining one-third of the reorganized equity. — Alan Zimmerman


More activism likely in 2016 as BDCs grow up

The BDC industry is experiencing growing pains.

Shares of most BDCs are trading below net asset value. Several BDCs are under attack by activist investors for stock underperformance, and these very public, acerbic battles are casting a pall over the entire sector. The recent market sell-off also punished BDCs as investors fled the credit-focused asset class.

Looking ahead, 2016 is likely to be a year of more shareholder activism for BDCs, market players say, a trend that could ultimately lift BDC share prices in 2016.

“We believe the BDC group could see stock prices increase 5% in 2016. When combined with an average dividend yield of 10%, we expect BDC total returns of 15%. In addition, the growth in shareholder activism could be a further catalyst for the group, particularly for some of the more discounted stocks,” said Troy Ward, an equity analyst at Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, in a Dec. 7 research note.

What won’t likely be a theme next year is raising capital through equity offerings.

“In a period where few BDCs have access to equity capital at accretive levels, earnings growth will be a function of recycling capital and taking optimum advantage of debt capital,” said Merrill Ross, an equity analyst at Wunderlich Securities. “We are looking for earnings growth of approximately 6.7% in 2016.”

Sector dramas unfold
Rifts within the BDC sector will likely widen next year, with battle lines drawn over management fees, the willingness of boards to buy back stock, and whether investors perceive management to be aligned with shareholder interests.

“Activism is going to be a big issue,” said Golub Capital CEO David Golub. Shares in Golub Capital BDC were trading at $16.70 at midday on Dec. 18, a premium to NAV of $15.80 per share as of Sept. 30.

“We are in the midst of what I would characterize as a crisis of confidence in the BDC industry. Investors are skeptical because of self-serving behavior by many BDC managers, often at the expense of their shareholders,” Golub said. The comment was in response to a question on the prospects for the BDC modernization bill, the passing of which Golub believes could be marred by poor timing.

“I hope the industry comes out of this period of activism by becoming a better neighborhood—an industry that’s more focused on shareholder value, that’s more focused on doing things that are fair and good for everybody and not just good for managers. That would be good for the industry.”

For now, all eyes are on dramas involving activist investors, including Fifth Street Finance and Fifth Street Asset Management, which are targets of a class action lawsuit. The suit alleges that the firms fraudulently inflated the assets and investment income of Fifth Street Finance to increase revenue at Fifth Street Asset Management. The firms deny the allegations and are fighting them in court.

Fifth Street Finance has agreed to meet with RiverNorth Capital Management, which is currently the largest stockholder in Fifth Street Finance, with a 6% stake.

American Capital has also been the target of an activist investor since the company unveiled plans to spin off BDC assets. Last month, Elliott Management, which owns an 8.4% stake in the company, urged shareholders to vote against the plan, saying a split would further entrench an ineffective management team that has been overpaid for poor performance and placed valuable assets at risk.

American Capital followed with the launch of a strategic review aimed at maximizing shareholder value, run by an independent board committee and advised by Goldman Sachs and Credit Suisse. Results of the review, which could include a sale of all or part of the company, will be announced by Jan. 31.

American Capital also started a share-buyback program of up to $1 billion of common stock as long as shares are trading 85% below net asset value as of Sept. 30, which was $20.44 per share. Shares were trading at $14.00 at midday on Dec. 18.

In another saga, the board of KCAP Financial, an internally managed BDC, received a letter in October from funds managed by DG Capital Management, its third largest stockholder with a 3.1% stake. DG Capital told the board that selling the business to another BDC would likely reap the best yield to shareholders, who have endured a sustained period of underperformance.

A three-way battle over TICC Capital has intensified in recent months. TICC Capital is urging shareholders to allow Benefit Street Partners, the credit investment arm of Providence Equity Partners, to acquire TICC Management, which manages the investment activities of TICC Capital. NexPoint Advisors, an affiliate of Highland Capital Management, has also submitted a proposal to cut fees and invest in TICC Capital.

The third party, TPG Specialty Lending, has unveiled a stock-for-stock bid for TICC Capital Corp., saying the offer is superior to the competing proposals from either Benefit Street Partners or NexPoint.

The move thrust Josh Easterly, TPG Specialty Lending’s co-CEO, into a prominent role in the drama that could result in such drastic measures as the management company losing its ability to manage a BDC, an outcome that few expected at this time last year.

“Those familiar with our history and investment philosophy understand that it is not in our nature to be public market equity activists,” Easterly said during an earnings call on Nov. 4.

“We have reluctantly assumed this role with respect to TICC as our industry is going through an inflection point,” he said. “We believe that our ecosystem can only thrive in a culture that fosters real value creation for shareholders.”

Awkward years
One possible outcome for the industry longer term is lower management fees. Medley Capital, which has been named as a potential target of activist shareholders, this month unveiled plans to expand a share repurchase program to $50 million after buying back 1.4 million of shares in the most recent quarter, and cut its base management fee on gross assets exceeding $1 billion to 1.5%, from 1.75%, and incentive fees to 17.5%, from 20%.

Medley Capital was part of a trend last year that saw shares of its management company listed in an IPO, following in the footsteps of Ares Management and Fifth Street Asset Management. Medley Management, whose shares trade on NYSE as MDLY, derives most of its revenue from fees for managing BDCs Medley Capital and Sierra Income Corp.

Brian Chase, the CFO of Garrison Capital, said an important factor moving forward is whether a BDC manager also manages other funds, outside of their BDC, that invest in privately originated debt investments. Having access to this institutional capital will be key to staying relevant in the market, particularly in an environment where raising fresh equity is challenging.

Some upsets are possible in the near term due to activist investors’ attention on the BDC sector.

“The BDC space is going through its awkward teenage years. I expect that in due course the sector as a whole will mature and institutionalize, which should further open up access to more capital and solidify their role in the financial system,” said Chase.  — Abby Latour

Follow Abby on Twitter @abbynyhk for middle-market deals, leveraged M&A, BDCs, distressed debt, private equity, and more.


Congress approves expanded borrowing for managers of SBIC licenses

Congress passed legislation on Friday that expanded borrowing capacity of managers of multiple Small Business Investment Companies (SBICs) licenses to $350 million from $225 million.

Holders of multiple SBIC licenses will have expanded access to low cost SBA debentures, at a rate of just under 3% currently.

One beneficiary is Monroe Capital, holder of three licenses, including through MRCC SBIC which had $40 million in SBA-guaranteed debentures outstanding as of Sept. 30.

“The potential is there for $125 million extra. It’s a game changer for the BDC,” said Monroe Capital CEO Ted Koenig.

Other beneficiaries include Main Street Capital, Capitala Finance, and Triangle Capital.

For an individual SBIC, SBA debenture borrowing is limited at $150 million. This will not change.

The change was passed as part of the Small Business Investment Company (SBIC) Capital Act of 2015, which received bipartisan support because it increased investment in job-creating small business without increasing government spending. The item was part of a fiscal package that Congress passed today granting the government over $1 trillion in spending measures.

SBICs invested over $6 billion in 2015, and account for more than $25 billion in assets across over 240 licensed SBICs, the SBIA said.

“This legislation allows proven SBICs to raise new funds and put capital to use in small businesses,” said Brett Palmer, President of the Small Business Investor Alliance (SBIA).

Other SBIA-backed proposals were part of the package and are now slated to become law. They include permanent extension of withholding exemption for foreign investors in Regulated Investment Companies (RICs), which will encourage long-term investment by foreign investors in BDCs.

In addition, Congress approved permanent extension of 100% capital gains exclusion for qualified small business investment. At the end of 2014, the exclusion was cut to 50%. — Abby Latour

Follow Abby on Twitter @abbynyhk for middle-market deals, leveraged M&A, BDCs, distressed debt, private equity, and more.


Third Ave’s liquidating debt fund holds concentrated, inactive paper

The leveraged finance marketplace is abuzz this morning ahead of a conference call to address to a plan of liquidation for the Third Avenue Focused Credit mutual fund following big losses this year, mild losses last year, heavy redemptions, and now a freeze on withdrawals. The news was publicly announced last night by the fund, and there will be a call at 11 a.m. EST for shareholders with lead portfolio manager Thomas Lapointe, according to the company.

Market sources yesterday relayed rumors of a near-$2 billion redemption from the asset class, and as one sources put forth, “the odd thing was it was difficult to trace the money that left, what was sold, and where it went.”

That was followed up by last night’s whopping, $3.5 billion retail cash withdrawal from mutual funds (72%) and ETFs (18%) in the week ended Dec. 9, according to Lipper, although it’s not entirely clear if that figure—the largest one-week redemption in 70 weeks—can be linked to Third Avenue. (LCD subscribes to weekly fund flow data from Lipper, but cannot see inside the aggregate observation.)

Nonetheless, it’s worthy of a dive into the open-ended fund, which trades under the symbol TFVCX. The fund shows a decline of 24.5% this year, versus the index at negative 2.94%, after a 6.3% loss last year, versus the index at positive 2.65%, according to Bloomberg data and the S&P U.S. Issued High Yield Corporate Bond Index.

It’s an alternative fixed-income fund that’s “extremely concentrated,” and “hardly representative of a ‘high yield’ or ‘junk bond’ fund,” outlined Brean Capital’s macro strategist Peter Tchir in a note to clients this morning. He highlighted that Bloomberg analytics show a portfolio that’s almost 50% unrated, nearly 45% tiered at CCC or lower, and just 6% of holdings rated BB or B.

The holdings are all fairly to extremely off-the-run, hence the trouble selling assets to meet redemption, and thus, the liquidation. The remaining assets have been placed into a liquidating trust, and interests in that trust will be distributed to shareholders on or about Dec. 16, 2015, according to the company.

Top holdings follow, and none have traded actively or very much in size of late, trade data show:

  • Energy Future Intermediate Holdings 11.25% senior PIK toggle notes due 2018; recent trades in the Ch. 11 paper were at 107.5.
  • Sun Products 7.75% senior notes due 2021; recent trades were at 87.5, versus 90 a month ago and the low 70s a year ago.
  • iHeartCommunications 14% partial-PIK exchange notes due 2021; block trades today were at 30 and 32, from 27 last month.
  • New Enterprise Stone & Lime 11% senior notes due 2018; odd lots traded recently in the low 80s, versus mid-80s last month.
  • Liberty Tire Recycling 11% second-lien PIK notes due 2021 privately issued in an out-of-court restructuring; trades reported in the mid-60s.

Amid those any many others of a similar ilk, the fund also reports a holding in Vertellus B term debt due 2019 (L+950, 1% LIBOR floor). The chemicals credits put the $455 million facility in place in October 2014 as part of a refinancing effort, pricing was at 96.5, and it’s now at 78/82, sources said.

“Investor requests for redemption … in addition to the general reduction of liquidity in the fixed income markets, have made it impracticable for FCF going forward to create sufficient cash to pay anticipated redemptions without resorting to sales at prices that would unfairly disadvantage the remaining shareholders,” according to the company statement.

“In line with its investment approach, FCF has some investments in companies that have undergone restructurings in the last eighteen months, and while we believe that these investments are likely to generate positive returns for shareholders over time, if FCF were forced to sell those investments immediately, it would only realize a portion of those investments’ fair value given current market conditions,” the statement outlined.

Further details are available online at the Third Avenue Management website. — Matt Fuller

Follow Matthew on Twitter @mfuller2009 for leveraged debt deal-flow, fund-flow, trading news, and more.


Loan technicals slide in November as supply dwarfs capital formation

In November, loan market technicals went from bad to worse as supply exceeded visible capital formation to the tune of $17.5 billion: $19.89 billion to $2.38 billion. It was the market’s biggest technical deficit since November 2007 when the prior cycle’s LBO boom crested.

As the chart illustrates, the market has experienced three successive months of technical red ink during which net new supply outran visible inflows by $32.34 billion, the largest three-month shortfall since the final quarter of 2006. — Staff reports

Loan market technicals Nov 2015




Garrison moves Speed Commerce, Forest Park Medical to non-accrual

Two of Garrison Capital’s investments, Speed Commerce and Forest Park Medical Center, were on non-accrual status in the recent quarter.

The investment in Speed Commerce comprised a $12 million term loan due 2019 (L+1,100 PIK, 1% floor) as of Sept. 30, a 10-Q showed. The fair value was marked at $9.7 million as of Sept. 30, and it accounted for 3.9% of assets.

In November 2014, Garrison Loan Agency Services was agent on a $100 million credit facility. Proceeds backed an acquisition of Fifth Gear and refinanced debt. Speed Commerce, based in Texas, provides web design and warehouse logistics services.

Nasdaq-listed Speed Commerce announced in April it hired Stifel, Nicolaus & Company as an advisor to explore a possible recapitalization or a sale of the company. Lenders have amended the loan several times, culminating on Nov. 16, when lenders agreed to a covenant requiring a sale of the company by Dec. 11.

Garrison Capital’s non-accrual investment in Forest Park included a lease to the San Antonio, Texas hospital and a $1.95 million term loan. The hospital has filed for bankruptcy due to a liquidity shortfall stemming from delays in obtaining third-party insurance contracts, and has hired an advisor to sell the facility.

Garrison Capital’s net asset value per share totaled $14.92 as of Sept. 30, compared to $15.29 as of June 30.

Garrison management attributed nearly half of the decline to a restructuring of SC Academy. Last quarter, that investment, a loan to Star Career Academy, was the lone non-accrual investment in the portfolio.

Star Career Academy, based in Berlin, N.J., provides occupational training for entry-level employment in health fields, cosmetology, professional cooking, baking and pastry arts, and hotel and restaurant management.

Garrison Capital is an externally managed BDC that invests in debt securities and loans of U.S. middle market companies. Shares trade on Nasdaq under the ticker symbol GARS. For additional analysis of Garrison Capital’s investment portfolio, see also “ActivStyle, Connexity loans added to Garrison Capital portfolio,” LCD News, Nov. 17, 2015. — Abby Latour

Follow Abby on Twitter @abbynyhk for middle-market deals, leveraged M&A, distressed debt, private equity, and more


Ares Corp. details 3Q15 portfolio stats, books $1.5B in new deals

Ares Corp. (NASDAQ: ARCC) booked $1.52 billion in new business during the third quarter, at an average interest rate of 7.8%, the lender detailed in its 10-Q filing yesterday alongside earnings. Exits totaled $1.34 billion, for net new investments of $183 million.

The 7.8% is 20 bps inside second-quarter investments, reflecting the better market conditions that borrowers enjoyed prior to the post-Labor Day correction. Spreads have since widened and should build up the average for fourth-quarter deals. In October, management said it funded $305 million in new investments for the fourth quarter at an average yield of 11.4%, while exiting $152 million at 8%.

First-lien commitments took a 75% share of third-quarter transactions, up from 37%, as ARCC shifted bookings away from the SSLP fund as that joint-venture with GE Capital winds down. Second-liens accounted for 21% of investments, down from 28% in the second quarter.

As of Oct. 29, the lender said it has $630 million in its backlog, which includes transactions that are approved, mandated or have a signed commitment that has been issued and that ARCC believes likely to close. There is an additional $425 million in the pipeline, which includes transactions that are in process, but have no formal mandate or signed commitment.

Portfolio stats
ARCC’s overall portfolio grew to $8.7 billion in assets, from $8.6 billion. The number of investments increased by nine, to 216. Average EBITDA per company is $58.8 million. As of June 30, 66% of the borrowers in ARCC’s portfolio generated less than $55 million of EBITDA.

Petroflow lifted ARCC’s loans on non-accrual status to 2.3% ($195 million) of the portfolio at cost, from 1.7%. Petroflow is one of three companies that ARCC considers true oil-and-gas-related investments, which account for roughly 3% of the portfolio. ARCC’s Petroflow investment is a first-lien position that was originated in July last year prior to the dramatic decline in oil prices. ARCC said it is working with the company and lender group to restructure Petroflow’s balance sheet. The principal investment totals $53.2 million. ARCC booked the 12% paper at a cost of $49.7 million, and the deal is now marked at a fair value of $37.9 million.

BDCs were not excluded from stock market volatility in the third quarter. ARCC’s stock slid to a 14% discount to NAV, from a 2% gap in the previous quarter. The stock closed the third quarter at $14.48, versus a book value of $16.79. The stock has since rebounded, to $15.49, to narrow the discount to 8%. By comparison, the BDC sector as a whole is trading at a roughly 15% discount. — Kelly Thompson


LCD’s High Yield Market Primer/Almanac Updated with 3Q Charts

LCD’s online High Yield Bond Market Primer has been updated to include third-quarter 2015 and historical volume and trend charts.

The Primer can be found at, LCD’s free website promoting the asset class. features select stories from LCD news, weekly trends, stats, and analysis, along with recent job postings.

We’ll update the U.S. Primer charts regularly, and add more as the market dictates (new this time around: an historical look at Fallen Angels, courtesy S&P).

Charts included with this release of the Primer:

  • US High Yield Issuance – Historical
  • 2015 High Yield Issuance, by Purpose
  • High Yield LBO Issuance
  • Fallen Angels – Historical
  • Cash Flows to High Yield Funds, ETFs
  • PIK Toggle Issuance (or lack thereof)
  • Yield to Maturity: Historical, Recent

LCD’s Loan Market Primer and High Yield Bond Market Primer are some of the most popular pieces LCD has published. Updated annually (print) and quarterly (online) to include emerging trends, they are widely used by originating banks, institutional investors, private equity shops, law firms and business schools worldwide.

Check them out, and please share them with anyone wanting an excellent round-up of or introduction to the leveraged finance market.


Like smaller peers, larger companies’ earnings likely slowed in 3Q

An index tracking private middle market companies has foreshadowed a slowdown in revenue and earnings of larger public companies in the third quarter of 2015.

“We expect to see the theme of slower growth play out this earnings season,” said Edward Altman, the Max L. Heine Professor of Finance, Emeritus at the NYU Stern School of Business.

“Middle market companies have historically outperformed their larger public peers, so we anticipate relatively low year-over-year revenue and especially EBITDA growth from S&P component companies in the third quarter,” said Altman.

Altman collaborated with Golub Capital on the Golub Capital Altman Index, which was featured today in the second edition of the quarterly Golub Capital Middle Market Report, which includes an analysis of the index. The index is based on the sales and earnings data of roughly 150 private U.S. companies in Golub Capital’s loan portfolio.

The index showed revenue of privately held middle market companies increased 7.95% year-over-year in the first two months of the third quarter of 2015, compared to 9.26% in the first two months of the second quarter of 2015.

EBITDA rose by 3.95% in the third quarter, compared to an increase of 6.93% year-over-year during the first two months of the second quarter of 2015.

Still, the index shows that private middle market companies remain a resilient driver of economic growth, said Lawrence Golub, Golub Capital’s CEO.

“While revenues and earnings in the period grew at a healthy pace, margins continued to be pressured by such factors as rising labor costs and the strength of the U.S. dollar, which is impacting the pricing power of U.S. firms with international competitors,” Golub said.

The index showed an 8.84% increase in revenue and a 9.88% increase in earnings for the healthcare sector. This was probably due to the Affordable Care Act, which increased access to health care services, the report said.

Revenue of private middle market industrial companies fell 0.68% year-on-year in the third quarter, and earnings of industrial companies fell 1.62%.

Revenue of private middle market information technology companies rose 6.65%, but earnings slumped 3.62%.

“The information technology sector saw negative profit growth, reflecting, we believe, greater investment in product development,” said Golub.

The index contains limited exposure to the financials, utilities, energy, and materials sectors. Thus, calculations are made for the public indexes both including and excluding these sectors.

The index “is the first and only index based on actual sales and earnings data for middle market companies,” the report said.

“The index has served as a reliable indicator of the overall growth rates in revenue and earnings of public companies in market indexes such as the S&P 500 and S&P SmallCap 600, as well as quarterly GDP, according to statistical backtesting dating back to 2012, when data began to be tracked,” the report said. — Abby Latour

Follow Abby on Twitter @abbynyhk for middle-market deals, leveraged M&A, BDCs, distressed debt, private equity, and more.


New Capital Southwest BDC to stand out by geography, partnership

It is not lost on Capital Southwest’s management that they are latecomers in the credit cycle to the increasingly crowded playing field of middle-market lending.

The company is undergoing a transformation that will create two publicly traded entities: an internally managed BDC that will focus on lending to middle-market companies and retain the Capital Southwest name, and a diversified growth company called CSW Industrials.

Shareholders of Capital Southwest will receive stock in CSW Industrials as a tax-free dividend. Shares in CSW Industrials are due to begin trading on Oct. 1 on NASDAQ under the ticker symbol CSWI. The company split was unveiled in December 2014.

On the eve of the transaction, management says they are prepared for the challenges.

“We wake up every morning with the worry about entering late in the credit cycle,” Bowen Diehl said. Diehl, the company’s chief investment officer hired in early 2014, will become CEO of the new Capital Southwest. Michael Sarner, hired in July, will become CFO following the spin-off. Both Diehl and Sarner previously worked at American Capital. “But we’re buyers of assets, so maybe the sell-off will take some of the froth out of the market.”

At least initially, the Dallas-based company will use geography to differentiate itself, originating most of transactions from a network of relationships in the southwest and southern U.S. Although Texas-based, they have little energy exposure among legacy equity investments.

They plan to assemble a granular credit portfolio across asset classes and industries.

To execute their plan, Capital Southwest announced a partnership this month with rival BDC Main Street Capital, based in Houston. Capital Southwest will initially inject $68 million into the joint-venture fund, and Main Street, $17 million. Capital Southwest will own 80% of the fund, and share in 75.6% of profits. Main Street will own 20%, and have a profits interest of 24.4%.

“Main Street has a robust and well-established origination platform in first-lien syndicated credits. To develop that, we’d have to hire three to four people. We think this is a win-win for shareholders of both Capital Southwest and Main Street,” said Diehl in an interview.

In January, Capital Southwest hired Douglas Kelley, who had been a managing director in American Capital’s sponsor finance practice for middle market companies. In June, Capital Southwest announced the hiring of Josh Weinstein from H.I.G. WhiteHorse, to source direct-lending and middle-market syndicated credits. Capital Southwest also expanded their team with the hiring of a couple of associates.

Thus, Capital Southwest’s team is largely set for the near term.

As part of the transition, Capital Southwest has divested $210 million of equity investments in the past 15 months, realizing $181 million of capital gains. In the future, equity exposure in the investment portfolio will be capped at 10-15%.

“We are no longer a buy-and-hold-indefinitely investment company,” said Diehl.

The company has already begun to ramp up the new credit portfolio, investing $42 million in eight middle-market credit investments.

Among these investments are a $7 million, second-lien loan (L+875) to data collection company Research Now; a $7 million second-lien loan (L+925) to Boyd Corp.; a $5 million second-lien loan (L+800) to retailer Bob’s Discount Furniture; and a $5 million second-lien loan (L+775) to Cast & Crew Entertainment Services. New credit investments include a direct loan to Freedom Truck Finance, as a $5.4 million last-out senior debt (P+975), and industrial supplier Winzer, as $8.1 million, 11% subordinated debt.

Capital Southwest’s credit portfolio will eventually be middle-market loans roughly balanced between lower-middle-market companies generating EBITDA of $3-15 million, and upper-middle market companies generating EBITDA of more than $50 million.

The company’s largest legacy equity investment is Media Recovery, which is the holding company of ShockWatch. The Dallas-based company manufactures indicators and recording devices to measure impact, tilt and temperature during transit. The fair value of the equity investment was roughly $30 million as of June 30.

Setting up the Main Street joint venture early in the transformation process has been positive. Moreover, Capital Southwest has $105 million of cash to investment after the $68 million committed to the Main Street joint venture.

“We are focused on strong credits. We are not in a hurry to put cash to work, but rather thoughtfully constructing a portfolio which produces a consistent market dividend for our shareholders,” said Sarner, CFO of the new company. –Abby Latour

Follow Abby on Twitter @abbynyhk for middle-market deals, leveraged M&A, BDCs, distressed debt, private equity, and more.